Monday, February 25, 2008

Boris Mikhahilov's panoramics - "At Dusk"


An absorbing set of panoramic photos by Boris Mikhailov from his book At Dusk. (via John Brownlow). The work was also featured in the V&A exhibition - Twighlight:


"1941. I was three years old and I can still remember the bombings, the howling sirens and the searchlights in the wonderful, dark-blue sky. Blue, blue, light-blue…' Boris Mikhailov


Boris Mikhailov made his series At Dusk in his home city of Kharkov following the collapse of the Soviet Union. In it, he uses twilight to record a society in transition and to evoke childhood memories.

Mikhailov proposes a monochrome visual language to deal with this new social reality. The photographs are tinted blue, both to make them appear 'old' and to refer to the 'blue hour' of twilight.


At Dusk also refers to Ukraine's deprivation during the Second World War, which the artist experienced as a child. Few photographs of this period survive, and there is little photographic history of Ukraine during the Soviet period, so Mikhailov proposes his own constructed history as a substitute.


At Dusk is therefore a hybrid between a documentary and a conceptual project, recording but also staging a time that might be both 1941 and 1993, or neither."


I often have a hard time "getting" Mikahilov and yet I never come away from his work feeling dissatisfied. Eventually I always come back for more.



5 comments:

Stan B. said...

One of my all time favorite works of photography- both incredibly beautiful, and depressing. Definitely worth going back to, over and over again...

And on a more "pragmatic" level, that tinting not only works aesthetically, it's one helluva fast and easy way to pump out work prints as final, fine tuned exhibition prints!

bob said...

Thanks for posting these - I just love his work. Nothing short of amazing...

Anonymous said...

Beautiful work here. The depressing tones and context help to draw us back to the deeper meaning behind the aesthetics. The panoramic viewpoint adds another element as well. We are no longer limited to an '8.5x11' frame, but are given a bit extra into the world we are welcomed to explore.

drueboy79 said...

I enjoy the color that enriches the mood of each and every panramic shot in the series of photos.Mood of color and figure represent and sadness/unity of depressed events that are happening within the photos.I enjoy the compostion as well in these shots.Good things!!!

Derrick said...

I'm quite enjoying your blog.